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Diane Caldera, Air Force Active Reserve

Diane Caldera began working for Omnitrans in 2005 as a coach operator. Six months later she became an HR clerk then later moved into Operations to work as a field supervisor. Now she is an assistant transportation manager who supervises, mentors and helps groom others to achieve their goals.

Diane has also served in the Air Force for the past 29 years and is currently a Major in the Active Reserve. Her goal is to reach the 30 year mark and attain the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

“I enlisted in the Air force when I was 21-years old, after completing two years at a junior college. Back in high school I had been a jock, but in those days there weren’t a lot of opportunities for women in professional sports. I knew I needed to develop skills, so I decided to join the Air Force to learn how to type,” laughed Diane. “I figured if I could learn to type, I would always be able get a clerical job.”

She spent the next four years as an active duty admin then entered the reserve. She became a flyer, working as a loadmaster on a huge 141 cargo plane. “There were not many women in that position in the late 80s, so I was something of a pioneer. I interviewed with three different flying squadrons and one of them agreed to take me on. I was responsible for the weight and balance of the aircraft, for the passengers we carried and the upload, download and security of our cargo. We transported everything from people to tractors, trucks, trailers and disassembled aircraft. I loved flying. We worked hard and for very long hours, but it was worth every minute.”

“The Air Force taught me a lot about time management,” Diane continues. “I’m currently on a medical flying mission where our nurses and technical crews actually fly and provide care on board the aircraft. My job is to handle the scheduling of the mission and to plan the details from beginning to end. How many nurses and technicians do we need? Do they have all their required training? How long is the mission? How far do they go? What lodging is available for the crew? What logistics are involved in loading and unloading the cargo? There are so many things that have to be taken into consideration for the successful completion of a mission. It’s the same with war games. You’re getting bombed and have to evacuate. You’ve lost communication. What are you going to do? You learn to forecast and make decisions under pressure.”

Because of her Air Force training, Diane pays close attention when job applicants list military service on their resume. She knows that those people tend to be process-oriented with strong organizational and project management skills. “They bring a lot to the table,” she says. “Because they tend to be very efficient and understand the broader picture, they often develop great ideas for streamlining processes that help us grow as an agency.”

Diane encourages everyone to go into the military for four years. “Especially the flying units, because I know how much fun I had. You’re able to see so many things and experience so much history. I’ve been to Hiroshima in Japan and saw where the A bomb was dropped. I learned to water ski and jet-ski in Wake Island in the Pacific. Europe is a beautiful country, so green and filled with historic old castles. I’ve seen the Pyramids in Egypt and the underground bazaars in Turkey. I’ve even been to Honduras during hurricane relief. I’ve seen the very, very poor as well as the unbelievably wealthy. People’s circumstances can be so vastly different. It reminds you how important it is to walk in someone else’s shoes so you can better understand their perspective. It’s a good lesson.”

In October 1997, Diane became part of the first all-female crew to fly a 141 cargo plane at the dedication of the Women’s Memorial Museum in Arlington Cemetery. The crew did a fly-by presentation and were honored on stage in front of 30,000 people. Their picture hangs in the museum to this day.

– Juno Kughler Carlson

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Email Juno Kughler Carlson at  juno.carlson@omnitrans.org

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